Monday, June 28, 2010

Upcoming Exhibition

I will be exhibiting along with three other artists are the Grenfell Art Gallery between 7th September to 16th October.http://www.grenfell.org.au/artgallery/

Watercolor Tip #2



What colors make up your pigments?
Pigments are almost always made up of more than one primary color.
For the purposes of this article please understand that all my color observations refer to Winsor & Newton  artists quality paint.  This is important as even though many manufacturers give their pigments the same name, they often have different compositions.  Now having made this stipulation let me talk more about what I meant in my first paragraph.
Well, for example, French Ultramarine, if you have a close look at it, has a very slight tinge of red to it in addition to its predominant blue color.  Alizarin Crimson on the other hand, has a slight bluish tint, in addition to its predominant color of red. For this reason, when you mix these two colors you end up with a nice bright purple color. 
However, if you mix French Ultramarine with Cadmium Red (which has a slight yellowish look) then the result is a more dull looking purple color. The reason for this is because in the first example only two primary colors were involved in the mix (Blue and Red) while in this second example all three primary colors were involved – Blue, Red and a little bit of Yellow.
Whenever you mix the three primary colors together you end up with a color leaning towards a grey or even black.
So, you should be able to see from the above that no only should you know which primary colors create which color but also which primary colors make up each pigment!

Happy Painting

Sunday, June 27, 2010

Watercolor Tip #1



Watercolor's most important ingredient is - WATER!
It is very important to know its characteristics or you will not be able to properly handle this medium.
Many of the wonderful effects achieved in a great watercolor painting are directly attributable to the amount of water on the paper, in your pallet mixes and on your brush. By keeping an eye on just how wet or otherwise all of the above are you can create magical wet on wet washes, dramatic dry brush edges or sharp wet on dry lines and surfaces - as well as an infinite range between each of these states.

Saturday, June 26, 2010

Upcoming Watercolor Workshops

5 Day Watercolour Workshop 2011

Date:      1st Workshop: Mon 10th to Fri 14th Jan11
                  2nd Workshop: Mon 17th to Fri 21st Jan11
Time:     9.30am—4.30pm daily
Cost:   $295
Location: Nepean Art Society at 3 North Street, Penrith

Limited seating participants allocated on first come basis


Friday, June 25, 2010

My First blog


My name is Joe Cartwright and I am a professional watercolor (watercolour) artist living in Australia.

I also run several art classes and regularly conduct week long watercolor workshops. From time to time I do demonstrations at various art societies.

I have started to blog, firstly to see how it may develop, but also to give me an additional communication medium with my patrons and students. I will be trying to keep it up to date with regular posts. I hope you enjoy it. It will no doubt develop over time. I have a companion web site where you can see my artwork and some of my other articles on watercolor at http://www.joecartwright.com.au/.